NOP Proposed New Rule on Organic Certification, Pt. 3

Happy Friday all! We close out this week with more on the NOP proposed new rules on Organic Certification. Today’s post deals with one of the biggest changes to the program – Avian living conditions – and a couple notes about transport and slaughter facilities. Again, the rule has been postponed to allow for a 30-day period for the public to comment on what action should be taken regarding the new rule. If you would like to comment on the course of action for the new rule, please visit: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/05/10/2017-09410/national-organic-program-nop-organic-livestock-and-poultry-practices-second-proposed-rule

The proposed final rule may be found in its entirety here: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/01/19/2017-00888/national-organic-program-nop-organic-livestock-and-poultry-practices.

AVIAN LIVING CONDITIONS

Avian living condition rules have been changed as well. The requirement for birds to have indoor space has been removed, but shelter must still be provided. Should you choose to provide indoor space for your birds, then you must comply with the requirements for indoor space. Indoor space must be large enough so that the birds may engage in natural behaviors and move freely.

Ammonia must be monitored monthly. When ammonia levels exceed 10ppm, remediation and additional monitoring must take place. Ammonia levels are not allowed to exceed 25ppm.

Natural lighting in the indoor space must be sufficient so that an inspector is able to read and write on sunny days while any artificial lights are turned off. Artificial lights may be used to augment natural light up to a 16-hour period per day. Artificial lights must be lowered gradually to encourage birds to settle in for the night.

Space requirements are given a significant overhaul with this new rule. 6 inches of perch per laying bird is required, although the lighting rail may count towards this requirement. For indoor exits, the requirement was removed that all birds must be able to exit within one hour. The new indoor density requirements for layers must not exceed (live bird weight): (i) Mobile housing: 4.5 pounds per square foot; (ii) Aviary housing: 4.5 pounds per square foot; (iii) Slatted/mesh floor housing: 3.75 pounds per square foot; (iv) Floor litter housing: 3.0 pounds per square foot; (v) Other housing: 2.25 pounds per square foot. The indoor density for pullets must not exceed 3.0 pounds of bird per square foot. For broilers, indoor stocking density must not exceed 5.0 pounds of bird per square foot.

Outdoor space has also been given new density requirements. For layers, outdoor space must be provided at a rate of no less than one square foot for every 2.25 pounds of bird in the flock. For pullets, outdoor space must be provided at a rate of no less than one square foot for every 3.0 pounds of bird in the flock. For broilers, outdoor space must be provided at a rate of no less than one square foot for every 5.0 pounds of bird in the flock. The outdoor space must be at least 50% soil with “maximal vegetative cover”. As above, work with your certifier to ensure compliance with this requirement.

Temporary confinement for birds is also allowed in certain circumstances, such as inclement weather, certain stages of life, health and safety risks, reseeding of soil, sorting for shipping, and nest box training, among others. All temporary confinements must be recorded.

TRANSPORT AND SLAUGHTER

New guidelines about transport and slaughter have been established in the rule. Foremost is that organic animals must be identified as such during transport. Trailers must provide season-appropriate protection from heat and cold, and must have bedding provided for anything other than poultry crates. Organic feed and clean water must be provided every 12 hours during transport, regardless of whether the trailer is moving or not. Operations that transport organic livestock must also develop an emergency plan to address reasonably foreseeable issues during transport, such as feeding, escapees, and euthanization of injured animals during transport.

Organic certified slaughter facilities must be in compliance with the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act of 1978. Certified facilities must also provide any documentation of FSIS noncompliance and corrective action records to certifying agents upon request.

 

“Always do your best. What you plant now, you will harvest later.” – Augustine “Og” Mandino

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